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20140426
20140504
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CNBC 12
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
threats? plus president obama and germany fell chancellor angulo merkel met at the white house today. will tighter -- german chancellor angela helmet at the white house today. will tighter sanctions actually change the situation in ukraine? we will be talking about that, next. ♪ its focus is shifting to cyber security, examining financial firms' preparedness for cyber threats. they are looking at how secure they really are. joining me, the former white house cyber security commissioner tom kellerman. what is the sec's biggest fear? what is going on? >> the lack of reporting in the marketplace. more firms are being breached. significant resources in material risk. >> financial firms? >> broker's houses, major publicly traded companies. >> how is it we do not hear about that? >> off and they are not aware they have been breached until they are notified that their accounts are being sold and bartered in the shadow economy. >> it is terrifying because you think of your financial data being out there. it really means we are all being vulnerable in a certain way. who is responsible, wou
. >>> now, despite merkel's calls for unity on russia, germany may have some problem with harsher sanctions. 36% of germany's natural gascon assumption comes from russia. 39% of their oil comes from russia. talk about going over a well, christopher chivas is a senior political analyst with the rand corporation. good to see you. will russia use this attack on pro-russian forces, separatists, whoever they are, inside ukraine as the provocation they were really looking for to attack and take territory from ukraine. >> i wouldn't be surprised at all, tyler, if that's what's going on. this is a strategy we have seen from russia before. the strategy is basically to aid and abet violence and turmoil and use it as an excuse for some kind of intervention. they probably will claim they're doing it on humanitarian grounds, but the reality will be that the large number of forces now poised on the border of eastern ukraine will move from russia into eastern ukraine. >> what is the end game here? what do you think will happen? will ukraine be split into two countries or what? >> it's very different to pr
. thanwonder if we care more angela merkel does. germany has a great business relationship with russia. wentieve gerhard schroder to work for a russian company after he was chancellor of germany. it seems that america has this , cold war,0's style leftover unhappiness, but no reason to be so worried. quickly direct economic interest in ukraine for the united states is not great. is alsode with russia not huge, although companies such as exxon mobil and boeing have important projects in russia. but it is important for foreign policy credibility. the u.s. has certain red lines. it committed to defending ukraine's territorial sovereignty. that credibility is important with respect to asia. president obama was reassuring asian partners and allies the u.s. would come to their defense in a situation in which chinese territorial ambitions seem to be growing. or is a broader repercussion that goes beyond ukraine and russia for the united states. >> we seem to be spreading ourselves them. we are going to defend asian countries against china? we are going to defend the ukraine against russia? di
in germany are not favorably seen, at least by the german business lobby. let's get to john harwood at the white house with more. john? >> not seen positively by the german business community or the business community elsewhere in europe, but i expect them to talk about trying to maintain a united front on sanctions. the nsa. they will have a news conference, a press availability after their meeting around 11:45 and i think you can also expect, carl, the president to have some sort of remarks off the top about these stronger than expected jobs numbers. >> all right. john, we'll come back to you for that later this morning. john harwood at the white house. another sign of the economic recovery. the ceo of host hotels, the country's largest lodging reit, says group bookings are up. he'll join us live in just a few minutes. later on, the ceo of expedia will join us with the first reaction to earnings last night. a lot more "squawk on the street" with dows close to session highs up 48. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so
on sector sanctions that will get the attention of russia? that is a fundamental issue. is germany willing to sacrifice short-term economic growth to put pressure on president putin? that is a fundamental question that needs to be answered. >> do you think they will be able to come up with an answer? >> mohamed nailed the biggest question about the meeting today. when it comes to the next round of sanctions, the big hammer the west has had hanging over fiber over vladimir putin has been the sectoral sanctions. $50 will take a major hit, billion of imports. angela merkel is hearing from their business interests. they don't want anything to do with the sectoral sanctions. her ability to stay aligned with the president is crucial for sectoral sanctions to work and not be implemented in patchwork fashion. >> mohamed, you mentioned because the economy is getting tighter that the cost of protectionism is rising as well. >> it is interesting we have not seen protectionism happen like you would have expected when we went into a major economic slowdown. the key issue now is step-by-step this diplom
relationships between the u.s. and germany in the past. >> the snowden spy stuff really poisoned relationships. it is going to be on the back burner, but it will be raised. that won't dominate the conversation. there will be a little bit of talk about getting these trade talks back in order. merkel is meeting with companies in the states as well. for the most part, i think they have four hours of talk scheduled. this is going to be about ukraine's and how you unify and make sure that the u.s. and the eu are on the same page and how you can convince the russians the errors of their ways. >> hans, we will leave it there. correspondent,al hans nichols. >> pharma frenzy friday. uprazeneca's vid is going -- bid is going up. does seem, we were talking about consolidation. this is about drawing battle about right? this is every large pharmaceutical company trying to take a chunk of the business. >> what you have here is the king of the megamerger. they have done these deals before. destruction isue a big moot point. at the moment, what they're saying is they will a 50 quit on the table and are prepar
has put up for sale and includes other allergy medication such as claritin. reports say germany's buyer is closing in on a deal to buy the unit for about $14 billion. on wednesday, another possible bidder, said it was no longer in the running. they could announce the transaction in the next few days. shares in frankfurt at this hour, they're trading up, a bit over 1% at the moment. back to you. >> bertha, thanks for that. good to see you. >> you, too. >> thank you. >>> in earnings news, linkedin reported a net loss. excluding items, the professional social networking site beat analyst forecasts as revenue rose 46%. membership rose 7%, the same growth rate as the fourth quarter. linkedin is forecasting full-year revenue growth below analyst estimates. shares in linkedin today currently up, 4% in frankfurt. they were down heavily after hours in the united states. >>> kraft foods has reported higher first quarter profits helped by cost cuts and moves to manage prices for key ingredients. revenue fell which missed analysts forecasts. kraft will be raising prices for nearly half of i
job. gave you a percentage of how many are negative. germany are doing more slamming there than in the united states. look, yelp is -- is it an honest broker? yes. i have 4.5 stars right now. >> ve-- in the restaurant. >> what happens if that falls? >> i'll tell you what i think of yelp if that falls. >> 4.5. i thought -- can you get 5? >> guy came in and did 3 and blamed, you know, i don't know said that i wasn't hosting well. hosting last night, did a darn good job. >> what's coming up on "mad money" tonight? >> two companies that reported dynamite upside surprises. one is reacting positively, the other is reacting negative. now they're both negative. very interesting. harman and dominos reported upside surprises that were up, stocks up, getting hit. that's the old pattern we experienced with the yelps and concurs. how about this. old economy not doing as well today. look at clorox. another one that people thought, hey, you can't miss. so let's see, i happen to be big believers in harman and dpz. not giving up on those. we have to learn more. >> finally after this week's gdp n
a deal done with t-mobile. it's got to negotiate with budget telecom back in germany, t-mobile.of >> u.s. regulators seem to be the hurdle. i think back to the at&t deal in 2011, everyone thought it will pass but u.s. regulators stopped it. what is he thinking? at&t buying t-mobile is different from sprint brine t-mobile. at&t is one of the big dominant ones up there with verizon. they are one and two. three and four are a distant three and four. he said, you put three and four together, we are still going to struggle to compete with one and two. also if you have the comcast situation. in a lot of ways, all of this is coming together. cable companies and dish companies and phone companies are all becoming one. he is going to argue that the landscape is different and it was just a few years ago. >> so they are trying to piggyback on the comcast-time warner cable deal, hoping regulators will see it as the whole industry shaking up. >> there was the airline deal when american airlines merge with u.s. air. you ask how it is relevant. the regulators let a deal go through that a number of fo
. >> there are four companies involved. sprint is 80% owned by softbank. t mobile is 67% owned by germany's deutsche telekom. that's why it is so confusing. >> is the government involved? >> absolutely, you have to get this passed the fcc and the department of justice. is the fourth-largest carrier in the u.s. only block the at&t deal with everyone thought would go through. >> $23 billion is the valuation? julian emmanuelle is with us from ubs. the fed has expressed confidence that we can grow going forward given the fact that we are continuing to taper. now we are seeing corporate executives express the same confidence in m&a. a month ago, we predicted it could grow by 17% this year. now, the numbers look like it's closer to 40%. >> will we see nominal gdp? you guys say the word confidence too much. that's what this is about. >> we were just talking about capex. m&a is just buying someone else's capital stock. you will get rewarded for that in the future. i bring it back to getting off the zero rate environment. i think zero rate of the most corrosive thing that anyone has ever seen and if you want
. very different in structures like germany and france. doesn't belong in the sing currency in my opinion. whether it joined the european union is the question. there's plenty to game. membership in the single market, it's a huge positive, particularly when you open up markets with trade and investment. that's been the anchor for growth in places like poland and the czech republic. the institutional reforms that need to join the european union are important. these are countries that net beneficiaries in a fiscal sense. they have huge structural funds flowing to these countries in order to facilitate the catch up growth. >> the new members of the eu, how long before they join the euro? because it's implied that when you join the eu now, you also at some point will enter single currency. >> the uk has an appetite. the new members don't. so it is implicit within the terms of the succession that they will at some point -- yet to be determined -- join a single currency. that's the key point, the events of the past two or three years has an appetite for entry into the single currency. czech, hu
. germa germany seem siemens isn't accepting that bid. >> reporter: they can solicit unsolicited bids. to that end, siemens is ready to sweeten an earlier bid, offering to swap some not all of the power assets along with cash. they called ge's offer compelling, alstom has untildown kd 2nd to make a decision. it would then seek approval of the company shareholders as well as the labor board. alstoms largest expects if offer. if approved it will immediately add to the companyings earnings eight to ten cents a share. it will mean that 75% of ge's operating mar jens will come from its industrial operations by 2016. that's important because it's targeted 70% of margins from industrial operations. so that allows it to exceed that goal. it sees $1.2 billion in cost savings. the therm am renewables and businesses would be the biggest acquisition of the ceo's 13.5 year tenure. in a statement. they say it furthers ge's strategy of expanding into industrial businesses leak power and water. now, when news of the ge bid first leaked, alstom is considered an industrial treasure. politicians were al
recycling plant as well in germany. where does this leave the aluminum sector now? the prices are almost half in 2008. we have massive overproduction. >> we believe that -- actually we use the word cautiously optimistic now. what we see for the better part of 2014 and also into '14 is that we see aluminum demand outpacing aluminum production for quite some time now, which is a new situation we haven't seen for quite some time. with that being said, i think it is important to note that we do have a huge inventory and the industry is such that we'll have to come to the market at some point in time. just the fact that production is now lower than demand is a good situation for the industry. >> i suppose this is about demand outside china. how much does china impact, when you talk about demand outside china, talk about demand inside china. >> we believe china will be self-sufficient on primary production. we have said that for quite some time. we believe the industry very much concurs with that. we saw china back within we had the financial crisis quickly adapting to lower demand in their co
much more pain than germany. in that sense, the west still has some real cards to play. >> do they have the guts to play them? >> that's an excellent question. >> by renouncing the use of military force, i think the president has undermined his own diplomacy. sanctions are a powerful weapon but russia is a lot bigger than russia -- then i ran -- is a lot bigger than iran. >> there is an institutional malaise, governments are too large and spend too much money. there are people who disagree with you. in your opinion, who is the most dangerous economic thinker writing today? >> i'm going to be extremely careful about answering that. >> you've never been extremely careful to date, why start now? are you kidding me? >> it is important not to personalized debate. the economics profession has a lot to answer for. there have been flawed models that led us into a financial crisis that hardly any professional economists foresaw. they tend to think the world is some kind of machine they can model. that has led us into all kinds of policy errors and wrong diagnoses. i won't name any in particular
a two-day meeting today and europe is up across the board led by the dax in germany. our road map goes like this. a day we here at cnbc has been counting down to. our official first 25 list of rebels, icons and leaders unveiled this morning. we'll bring you the ranksings. >> merck shares are higher in the premarket after it beat the street despite some generics cutting into revenue and reaffirmed full-year guidance. >> coach shares lower in the premarket. women's accessories taking a lit despite earnings coming in ahead of consensus. first up, the list is out, this morning cnbc has unveiled its first 25 list as we celebrate 25 years on the year. the people who have had the biggest impact on business and finance over the last quarter century. the top 5 is led by steve jobs, followed by bill gates, ben bernanke, alan greenspan, the google guys, written, page and schmidt and jeff bezos. on "squawk on the street" we'll have interviews with two of the first 25, starbucks ceo and chairman howard schultz going to sit down with jim and david has hewlett-packard's ceo meg whitman later on in th
's stronger than what france can do. it means that europe must have a strong growth everywhere, in germany, spain, uk, to go to converge to this target. >> do you think the french economy would be able to benefit from the growth from other countries? >> that's one of the targets of the plan is to say we tried to improve the company's situation and in that case, it will be both to capture the eurozone trajectory. that's the target of the government. >> phillip, when we tried to reform the french economy, there's always something funny or perhaps even worrying. the best reform in france is always the one that is not impacting myself. so french people are reluctant of the impact of the reform. >> it's mostly everywhere always the same thing. it's always better when your neighbor is changing its mind in this situation. what we see and what is important currently in france is that gdp per capita growth, it means that what you earn is what i lost. there's one winner, one loser. and that's why it's practically difficult at this moment of the cycle. that's why manuel vass ask ed, o try to make thi
like that of britain or germany or places like that. >> but, professor, there seems to also be a debate even if they change the tax, even if they make it desirable for the american companies to bring their overseas money back to the u.s. it doesn't necessarily mean that they are going to invest it here to boost our economy and hire more people. do you agree with that? >> it may not happen immediately. look, when profits come home from abroad, companies will use them for all sorts of purposes but in the long run, allowing a more efficient reallocation of resources within the companies can only be good from the standpoint of productivity that leads to economic opportunity. >> what, professor, is at the heart of this technique? is it the repatriation in one of the pieces $69 billion of pfizer's cash that's domiciled overseas or is it just year to year being able to take advantage of a lower corporate tax rate or is it that we double tax corporate profits in the united states? what is it? >> there are three things that britain offers that the united states does not. the first is as your seg
relations. germany, france, we have to go down the list. fascinating story in the times about putin's money about whether it is real or not. so many different situations to keep track of after this. female announcer: sleep train's interest free for 3 event ends sunday. it's your last chance to get three years interest-free financing on beautyrest black, stearns & foster, serta icomfort; even tempur-pedic. plus, get free delivery, and sleep train's 100-day low price guarantee. but hurry! sleep train's interest free for 3 event, ends sunday. ♪ sleep train ♪ ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ at your ford dealer think? they think about tires. and what they've been through lately. polar vortexes, road construction, and gaping potholes. so with all that behind you, you might want to make sure you're safe and in control. ford technicians are ready to find the right tires for your vehicle. get up to $120 in mail-in rebates on four select tires when you use the ford service credit card at the big tire event. see what the ford experts think about your tires. at your ford dealer. on ca
if we have shown the stock, but you can see that trading slightly up, 31.02 is the number. and germany's british consumer giant ricket is said to be among the final contenders. merck's cop summer unit is best known for coppertoen sunscreen and claritin. >> for rickets. >> for rickets? >> yeah. >> thank you. i know where you are going with that. >> i'm not going anywhere. i missed you. i i am just glad you are here. i'm glad you are not in the seminary here, which would be a shocker. anyway, that was a big day. >>> we have another big deal. this is a european situation. >> you go up against the -- over here we might be a little bit nationalistic about some of our companies, like i didn't want the bacon. and bacon is like $12 a pound now. you don't have to say i was right about that, but we didn't want to sell smith view. nothing happens with the final say. >> it's always been that way in france. >> i know. i'm not surprised. >> this is just like welcome to france, welcome to the world. >> they didn't want to sell yogurt. now this is the crown jewel of the industrial -- do they have anyt
. a big move in astra's shares, one of the top on the ftse, 14%. pfizer a slight bit higher in germany today. katherine boil is joining us with more on that. there's been a lot of discussion behind the scenes, is the next offer going to be a hostile one? >> well, it looks like pfizer is very much taking that tone with the statement today saying they made a couple of efforts to engage with astrazeneca management and they are not engaging back and are going directly to shareholders. what we have to see next is how much of a sweetener they are coming back for the shareholders because actually, if you look at astrazeneca shares today, they are trading close to the initial offer price made back in january. so pfizer definitely is going to have to add a little bit more to that to see shareholders really respond. >> no doubt the hedge funds are snipping around this deal already, but when we talk about the hostile approach, these are much more difficult to get across. but you have a backdrop where big farmer is on the move with the hallowed activity out there. do you think it's us is taped for
on the planet. and a new exhibit of art, banned by nazi germany. >> to actually see the art that was deemed as un-german is fascinating. >> rose: we have those stories and more on what happened and what might happen. >> there's a saying around here: you stand behind what you say. around here, we don't make excuses, we make commitments. and when you can't live up to them, you own up and make it right. some people think the kind of
merkle is the key as the chancellor of germany the largest economy and the largest amount of political clout as well. she gradually is coming along but i feel the strategy is -- and we should have acted unilaterally in by leading we had a much better chance to bring them with us as opposed to trying to get them to move at our urging and if that is a different strategy. we should have stepped out ourselves there is some very good chance they will follow ashley: i thought he would take it to a point then back off but not now. >> his strategy has always been being run at said ukraine is admitting defeat the recovery with prestige or power was the indexation of crimea is all about to turn it to the cooperative arrangement this government is now anti-russia in those 50,000 troops on the border is all about intent -- intimidation he does not want to invade he knows that will bring a huge amount of problems by the time the west reacted it was already over. >> no doubt. the ukrainians have no match but there are major issues but he occupies 12 cities right now that the ukrainians cannot get th
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)